Spontaneous Screen Printing Class

10 07 2012

Beth gets ready to print with a glue screen.

Beth’s freezer paper prints.

Laurie’s unique pumpkin prints

Mark tries adding color to his freezer paper prints.

I love how this one turned out.

Jan works on a piece of commercial cloth, adding more designs to it.

One of Jan’s paper designs.

This is another of Mark’s designs. It took him a while to paint this design on the screen, consequently some of the dye dried and when he printed it, it had a breakdown printing appearance to it.  Of course, I love that.

Susan paints some of the open areas of her prints.

Some of Suzy’s work.

A pretty cool freezer paper screen made by another Beth in the class. I really like this screen design.

 





First Strathmore Workshop

14 01 2012

Strathmore is hosting more workshops this year.  The first one is being taught by Traci Bautista.  Here is my first week’s work…er…play.

There are layers of stuff on here…Smooch Spritz inks sprayed over resists and plastic canvas, acrylic paints, acrylic inks, markers of all kinds, white-out pen, and oil pastels last.  The neat thing about these workshops for me is they help me get acquainted with different products that I have not used before.





Monday

7 11 2011

Today, my intent was to get started on printing some silk scarves in Christmas colors for my opening reception.  Well, getting started is about all I’m getting done.

First the scarves have to be soaked in white vinegar, then they have to dry.  That takes some time.  Then I made a silk screen with glue…and now it is drying.  So I decided to blog while I’m sitting here waiting for everything to dry!

First, I gotta tell you about all the new flavors of fudge I came across this weekend.  I’m in fudge heaven. I went to a craft festival in Harrisburg to purchase some lotion bars and other products for Christmas.  I came home with MUCH more!

First, the fudge.  We taste tested pumpkin, dreamsicle, white chocolate with apricots and walnuts, white chocolate with cherries and pecans…oh. my. gosh.  I’m in love with the two white chocolate fudges.  I purchased these to send to my mother-in-law for her birthday.  She is a fudge lover, so that is usually what I get her.  I was going to order some from a catalog until I saw this locally made fudge.  I purchased both the white chocolate fudges and some Rocky Road that I knew she would like.  Of course, since I brought it home with me, she now has to share some of it with me! She can’t eat 3 lbs. of fudge by herself anyway!  I have since found a recipe online for the white chocolate with apricots and walnuts.  I will definitely be trying that recipe this year.

drool.......

Yesterday, I crocheted the other wrist warmer.  I had made one and embellished it and had never gotten around to making the second one.  I finished it and then fished out a pattern for a flower that is used on a strand to wear around your neck.  So I had to try those out….

Cute? I think they are.

Little crocheted flowers

I love the yarn.  The red and purple flowers are made from Deborah Norville’s Everyday soft worsted anti-pilling yarn.  There’s no fuzzies on it.  It’s very nice yarn.

So now I put a question to you….should I use this one on my wrist warmers?….

 

…or this one?

I’ll probably just end up putting a row of buttons on the left one, but I did think it would be fun to have different embellishments on each one.  These are fingerless and fun to wear!





Masters: Art Quilts Vol. 2

24 08 2011

Martha Sielman’s second volume of the Masters: Art Quilts published by Lark Crafts is definitely 400 pages of eye candy,  a colorful, visually stimulating treat to the art of 40 contemporary  artists working in textiles.  Sielman features work, not only from the United States, but from across the globe, including Switzerland, Australia, Hungary, France, So. Africa, the Netherlands, Canada, Israel, Russia, Japan, Norway, and England.  I love this global selection, as well as her exploration of the career and personal backgrounds of each artist and how this contributes to the way they work.  This background provides a rich supplement to the amazing art featured in the book.  There are ample selections of each artist’s work, with 5 to 10 pages of full page photographs  devoted to each.  I feel that I have seen a good representation of the artists.

There are many familiar (to me) artists featured: Paula NadelsternLaura Wasilowski, Nelda Warkentin, Jane Dunnewold, and Linda MacDonald. Others are totally unknown to me, but their addition to this catalog greatly enrich my visual experience with every page.

Sielman’s choice of artists who work in a broad range of styles and techniques contributes to the appeal of the book.   Some are personal histories providing a view into worlds unknown to most, such as  Carolyn Crump’s portraitures which feel very much like linocuts because of the black outlines she uses.  Dutch quilter Miriam Pet-Jacobs uses commentary with messages both obvious and elusive.  I love Netherland’s resident Leslie Gabrielse’s combination of collage and realistic figures.  He states that he is “very drawn to commercial fabrics…fascinated by the variety of motifs and textures they have to offer.”  Pamela Fitzsimons’ work is based on the Australian landscape, creating lines, colors, and patterns reminiscent of the country.   Dirkje van der Horst-Beetsma creates landscapes based on her native province in the Netherlands which are made up of several sections laced together with unusual materials such as zippers or inner tubes. Izabella Baykova’s depictions of Russian cityscapes and fairy tales are renditions of views from her St. Petersburg apartment and folk stories using layers of sheer silk and paint. I find her work to be amazingly intricate. Daniela Dancelli’s abstract work, using a combination of different textiles along with plastic, laminated newsprint, and found objects, incorporates strong colors, bold marks and handwritten letters into her symbolic pieces.

This volume is a must-have addition to any serious textile artist’s library.  It will be kept in my home alongside Volume 1 and studied over and over again.  Martha Sielman’s curating has provided an invaluable service to the textile art community.

For those interested in supporting the arts, Masters: Art Quilts Vol. 2 can be purchased through SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Association).  Lark is donating the full $24.95 amount to SAQA.





August This N’ That

8 08 2011

Summer is winding down…it’s August already.   It has gone by quickly.

Along with leaving town a couple of times, working to have items ready for the artisans/farmer’s market each weekend, and now produce coming in from the garden, a girl has to work hard at getting quality time making art.  I have an exhibit to hang in October…!

I have been working on some new work and last week saw me spending a lot of time just doing art.  “Composition” is a new series I am working on.  It is mixed media work and I am enjoying it immensely.  I am having loads of fun using paint, ink and pastels to create on paper and cloth.

Composition - collaged base of paper and cloth, gesso, acrylic paint, oil pastels, ink paper

There are more coming in this series and manner of working.  These measure approximately 15″ square.  Work is also proceeding on a larger piece using discharged black cotton sateen and a rust dyed cotton feed sack.

Scarlet and I have started working on Christmas ornaments for the gallery gift shop.  Mine will mostly be mixed media and made of papers.  They are started but there is much to be done before they are ready for display.

New journal covers I have been creating this summer are photos printed on cotton. Oh, look…one of them is the new artwork, Composition.

I have a couple of shows I will be working in September.  See my events tab (above) to see where I will be.  October will be the time I am finishing up everything for my exhibit in New Harmony, IN.

Well, I guess it’s time to get back to my other work now….





What I’ve Been Up To

23 05 2011

Last week, I ran out of thread on a piece of art I was stitching on.  Rather than take a whole day and drive an hour away to buy thread, I opted for an internet order instead.  Of course! the company only had one spool of a color I needed, I found out later, and of course, I need more than one, so yes, I will be making that 1 hour trek in a couple of weeks, but I made a lunch and outing date with a friend, so driving an hour for thread won’t be all that I am doing that day.  Oh, the down side of rural living…even if I do love it!

In the meantime, there is plenty for me to do while I wait for the thread….so I got started on making some prints on cloth.  These will be deconstructed prints.  First I had to create the screens.  I smeared a few colors of dye paint onto the back of blank silk screens, then pushed objects that will create designs and texture into the paint.  Then let dry for however long it takes.  Purchased screens or homemade screens using framing wood pieces that lock together…it’s all good.  I have learned something about making the homemade screens though.  Do not use polyester sheers…they STRETCH!  And you won’t like it.  Use nylon material to avoid this. I am going to have to re-do some of my screens.

While I had the dye and the bubble wrap out, I decided to play.  I do that a lot…try something new…see what happens.  I laid my dry soda soaked cotton over the bubble wrap (to see how to soda soak cotton, see my tutorial on the sidebar), then laid a blank screen over it and pulled prints.

This deposits quite a bit of paint on the cloth, hence the following “monoprint”.

Since these two pieces use the same colors, they can be used together in something, but there is variation in the cloth.

I still need to finish one piece of cloth before I put my stuff away…maybe today!

But right now, I am making Mounds balls. ;=)





Workshop #3, Week 2

11 05 2011

I posted earlier some of the pages I painted with fluid acrylics as backgrounds for Roz Stendahl’s class I am taking online.  Here is the Week 2 reveal.  Since I’m not that much of a sketch-er, I decided to save time (at least at this point) and use cutouts from photography that I do.

Mum Garden





Smooch Spritz

4 05 2011

I said I would post a sample and here it is.  I played with the Smooch Spritz today.  These are inks in a small spritzer.  Kind of fun to play with but one has to learn control over the spray!

In the sample, I first sprayed over the Arabesque stencil from The Crafter’s Workshop.  I sprayed several colors.  I love the look of the sprayed ink on the paper. Then I made a paper mask in the shape of a bottle (some may think it is a gourd, but I tried hard to make it look like a bottle!).  I laid this down in various positions and sprayed over it.  I have 6 colors of the spritz.  I love the yummy yellow.  The Spritz has metallic bits in it, but that may be hard to tell from the photograph.  This was done on watercolor paper.  I will have to try it on fabric next.





Roz Stendahl’s Workshop At Strathmore Begins

4 05 2011

I played last night at creating backgrounds for Roz’ class. I enjoyed it immensely. I did use some acrylic inks to splatter on the pages, but they seemed to dry v…e…r…y slowly, so I am not pleased with them. I am wondering if the brand or the age of the inks might be the issue. I used a Crafter’s Workshop circle grid stencil and distress ink pads to make the designs. Distress ink is probably not going to be waterproof going forward, but we shall see. I enjoyed playing with the colors and textures.

Mixed Media Visual Journal

I REALLY like the mixed media paper…not as heavy as the watercolor, but takes the wet media very well.

So now I am making a list of Golden Fluid acrylic paints I need…I pretty much used up the only yellow I had.

The next photo is the 140 lb. watercolor journal.





Water Soluble Pencils

15 04 2011

Life has been very busy recently in March.  I haven’t had much time to do much of anything.  Because I needed to PLAY a little bit as a break from work and play with something that didn’t take much time….

I have been playing with water soluble pencils.  I love, love, love these new tools.  So much pigment…such great colors.  I bought them because I was going to be taking some online journaling classes and thought I might want them for the classes, plus my curiosity was piqued about them.  I have used the water soluble crayons before, but these are a little different.

I have a 5.5″ x 8″ visual journal with 140 lb. watercolor paper.  I decided to do  color washes using the pencils on some of the pages as a warm up exercise of play.  On some of them I doodled in ink, on some I tested stencils.  Most likely none of these are finished, but will have more added to them over time.

The next one is a blind drawing done with charcoal, then it was wetted.  After that I tried various pens and water soluble pencils.

More new tools…a water soluble charcoal pencil and a water brush.  The brush has a barrel to hold water in it.  So when you use water soluble pencils, crayons or charcoal, you just squeeze a little bit of water down to the brush tip and voila! you can paint!








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